Filing For Bankruptcy? Check Out This Article!

Filing for bankruptcy is a complex process. It involves a lot of paperwork at federal and local levels. Luckily, there are resources to help you find the information you need to put your financial past behind you.

Federal Chapter 7 bankruptcy forms

If you’re filing for Chapter 7 bankruptcy, you’ll need to fill out the U.S. government’s official bankruptcy forms found at http://www.uscourts.gov/forms/bankruptcy-forms. There are nine forms in total. These forms include:

  • B 103B – Application to Have the Chapter 7 Filing Fee Waived
  • B 108 – Statement of Intention for Individuals Filing Under Chapter 7
  • B 122A-1 – Chapter 7 Statement of Your Current Monthly Income
  • B 122A-2 – Chapter 7 Means Test Calculation
  • B 309A – Notice of Chapter 7 Bankruptcy Case – No Proof of Claim Deadline (For Individuals or Joint Debtors)
  • B 309B – Notice of Chapter 7 Bankruptcy Case – Proof of Claim Deadline Set (For Individuals or Joint Debtors)
  • B 309C – Notice of Chapter 7 Bankruptcy Case – No Proof of Claim Deadline Set (For Corporations or Partnerships)
  • B 309D – Notice of Chapter 7 Bankruptcy Case – Proof of Claim Deadline Set (For Corporations or Partnerships)
  • B 318 – Discharge of Debtor in a Chapter 7 Case

Local Chapter 7 bankruptcy forms

These forms are a little harder to track down. You can start by searching online for your state and county’s bankruptcy court website. But there are a couple websites that may be helpful, too. Try http://www.justice.gov/courtlinks or http://www.uscourts.gov/court_locator.aspx to track down information about your local government’s bankruptcy filing requirements, or contact a local bankruptcy attorney.

Chapter 7 bankruptcy checklist

To ensure the proper paperwork and steps are followed:

  • Consult a bankruptcy attorney
  • Complete and submit all of the federal government forms for Chapter 7 bankruptcy
  • Complete and submit all of the required local forms for Chapter 7 bankruptcy
  • Keep track of any court dates or hearings to ensure attendance
  • Log any questions you have along the way and ask the proper official for answers. Missing a step can cause you time and money.
This entry was posted in Uncategorized. Bookmark the permalink.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s