Time is Money—In Today’s High-Speed World, It’s Truer Than Ever

Americans who spend 2,500 hours per year engaging in work and all its related demands (commuting, studying, etc.) can determine the value of their time by assessing their yearly total income. Those who net roughly $12,000 can value an hour of their time at a hair under 5$, while those who net $100,000 can bump that number to $40 an hour. Included in this calculation is the time spent investing in the skills that help generate this income, which leaves many thinking their time is worth less than they thought. This brings us to the conclusion that it takes a lot of time to make money.

In a competitive modern job market, then, every hour spent in a non-productive fashion lowers that hourly bar. When our earning potentials are linked to the time we put in to studying and building up our skills, every hour lost is money lost. Time really is money when you can put a value on an hour.

According to a national census, a third of Americans now hold college degrees, which is the highest number ever recorded. It takes many weekly hours over the course of 4 years to get a degree, but the time often pays off with college graduates earning an average 56 percent more annual income than non-graduates. The numbers here go to show that an investment of your available hours into pursuits related to income, namely work-related business and education, up the value of subsequent hours.

Globalization is shrinking the size of our world while ballooning the size of its economy and job market. With this in mind, effective people will understand the value of treating their time as a vehicle that generates income. Just like a wise investment of capital, a wise investment of time-saving businesses, such as 45o6-transcript.com, consistently increasing returns, as the data here have shown.

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